No Design Legislation

Opposing interior design legislation everywhere

Plan Check Denial in Los Angeles?

CCIDC needs your help


We are looking for Certified Interior Designers who have been denied plan check for their non-structural, non-seismic interior design plans by the Los Angeles Dept. of Building & Safety (LADBS) and

If you reside in the City of Los Angeles and are willing to contact your Los Angeles city council member, our goal is to set up a meeting with the LA Dept. of Building & Safety (LADBS) to discuss their overly restrictive policy as it relates to their document number P/BC 2002-073, (Policy on Signed and Wet Stamped plans).

Thus far, attempts to meet with LADBS to discuss their policy have been rebuffed by their Chief Building Officer (CBO). If you have had this experience of being denied plan check for relatively simple interior design plans, and are willing to go to your city council member to request a meeting with the head of the LADBS, please E-mail Doug Stead, CCIDC’s Executive Vice President, at doug@ccidc.org. Thank you.

August 18, 2009 Posted by | California, CCIDC | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NY – Design Practice Act to Limit Who Can Bid on State Contracts

Only 207 designers in the entire state would qualify!  Follow the links below for talking points and contact information for legislators to send your opposition letters to.

From NKBA:

Take Action. Now.

NEW YORK – DESIGN PRACTICE ACT INTRODUCED TO LIMIT WHICH DESIGNERS MAY BID ON STATE CONTRACTS; FULL LICENSURE OF DESIGNERS SOON TO FOLLOW!

After losing their attempt to restrict the title of “interior designer” to only those designers who are “certified” in the State of New York (a restriction that even ASID has now given up on), the interior design lobby is back again with an even more restrictive, anti-competitive design practice bill. Assembly Bill 7764 provides that state contracts for interior design services must specify only certified interior designer (i.e., one who has passed the NCIDQ exam). There is a grand total of 207 certified interior designers in the entire State of New York who would be eligible to bid on state projects!

Even if you do not intend to bid on state projects, passage of this bill will absolutely impact your business because this is merely the first step towards achieving the ultimate goal of the design lobby and the American Society of Interior Designers – licensing the entire design community and limiting the performance of design services to only those who have met the restrictive, self-imposed requirements that ASID and NCIDQ have established. Once the lobby gets the State to recognize that only certified interior designers are competent to bid on state projects, full licensure to “protect the public” will surely follow and your work in the State of New York will be in jeopardy.

Please click this LINK to be taken to our website for more information and to send a message to the Committee. Let them know that there are more than 207 competent and qualified designers in the State of New York and that limiting the competitive bidding process to only a handful of designers would deny the contracting agencies the ability to obtain the expertise needed to complete the job and at an increased cost to the taxpayers.

June 5, 2009 Posted by | ASID, New York, NKBA | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Urgent – MA HB262 Hearing May 19 – Inconsistent Bill Will Demote You to 2nd Class Status

How perfect that the sponsor of this bill’s name is actually Kafka, given the very Kafkaesque nature of all attempts to impose legislation on interior designers.

From IDPC:

==============================================================================================
Interior Design Protection Council
Protect your future!

HB 262 demotes you to second class status!Month Year

Hearing set for May 19, 2009

NEWS ALERT!
HB 262 – a title act to certify interior designers, promoted by the Massachusetts Interior Design Coalition (MIDC)and sponsored by Rep. Louis Kafka, has been scheduled for hearing next Tuesday, May 19th at 10:00 a.m. in Room B-1 at the State House in Boston.

HB 262 is:

1. ANTI-COMPETITIVE. This bill will ONLY benefit a very small minority of interior designers who will be able to market themselves as “State Certified” and unless you have passed the NCIDQ exam, YOU WILL NOT. If you do not have an approved formal college degree, and have not worked for 2 to 4 years under another licensed designer (a.k.a “indentured servitude), you are not even eligible to sit for the NCIDQ.

2. IMMATERIAL. The only legitimate reason to impose regulation on an entire profession is to protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. Not a shred of evidence has ever been presented which would warrant a conclusion that the unregulated practice of interior design places the public in any form of jeopardy.

3. INCONSISTENT. Another bill, HB 2999 has also been introduced by Rep. Kafka which appears to allow ALL interior designers to bid on state projects (we’re still checking that one out). However, in direct contrast, this bill — HB 262 — includes language to amend the bidding law so that only interior designers that “hold a valid certificate indicating that they are a Certified Interior Designer” would be able to bid on state projects. Why would Rep. Kafka introduce two different amendments to the same existing law (Chapter 7 Public Building Construction)? At best, this is sloppy legislation writing. At worst (and we believe this to be the case), this is a classic example of the duplicity and the under-the-radar efforts that unfortunately are a hallmark of the pro-regulation camp.

4. ANTI-CONSUMER. This bill would give consumers a false sense of security that “registered” designers are offering addition protection beyond the measures already in place, which is untrue. Instead, the effect on consumers will be to artificially inflate prices. The Federal Trade Commission has recommend against regulation of interior designers.

5. UNNECESSARY. This is an exercise in wasting taxpayer money, government time and state resources. The bill serves absolutely no public purpose, and merely duplicates what is already available through private organizations.

6. INCREMENTAL. It has been well-documented that seemingly innocuous title acts are used by proponents to get a foot in the door, only to come back in a few years and attempt to expand the law into a full blown practice law that would put you out of business. MIDC has tried repeatedly to pass practice act legislation and failed, so they are trying this alternative approach.

In today’s difficult economic climate, state government should enact no new laws which would make it more difficult for Massachusetts entrepreneurs to earn an honest living unless there is compelling statistical and/or empirical evidence that the public is placed in jeopardy without such regulation. Clearly, there is absolutely no such evidence.

TAKE ACTION!

1. NOW:

Time is of the essence! Continue reading

May 18, 2009 Posted by | Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tennessee Practice Act Withdrawn by Sponsor Due to Opposition!

From the Interior Design Protection Council:

SB 2078 is dead for this year!

<Members of the Tennessee design community:

Celebration is in order — the practice act will NOT threaten your livelihood this year! Your phone calls, emails, and visits to the Senators’ offices succeeded.

Rather than face the certain vote-down of his bill, the sponsor withdrew SB 2078 and put it into “General Sub[committee].” Here are the sponsor and TIDC lobbyist’s testimonial comments, along with our response. Continue reading

May 11, 2009 Posted by | ncidq certification licensing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

TENNESSEE MEMBERS-HEARING ON DESIGN PRACTICE ACT JUST ANNOUNCED-IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUESTED!

OPPOSE Senate Bill 2078 and House Bill 2016 – Interior Design Practice Act. Calls Needed NOW!

We have just learned that that interior design licensing bill has been put on notice for a hearing next Tuesday or Wednesday, April 21- 22 before the Senate Commerce Committee. We must act now to let the members of the Committee know that, especially in this difficult economic climate, no legislation should be considered that will impact your ability to do business in Tennessee.

AT ISSUE: A Design Practice Act which will: Continue reading

April 17, 2009 Posted by | Minnesota, ncidq certification licensing, New York, NKBA, Tennessee | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

Fire Retardant Codes Cause More Harm Than Good?

Some building codes not only do not protect the public as well as we would like to think they do, but may actually result in practices that do more harm to the public than they prevent.

The folks who are trying to legislate most designers out of business using largely health, safety, and welfare claims don’t seem to realize that some of the very building codes they tout as so necessary for designers to know are likely creating bigger problems than they are actually solving, that the testing and standards required by code aren’t cut and dried, black-and-white, complete solutions to anything with no downsides.

Who is teaching designers to actually think and learn for themselves? God knows it’s not the design schools. The design education process that is being promoted as the be-all and end-all pathway to learning how to be a designer and keep people safe in the built environment largely produces people who blindly follow what they are taught – by nonscientists, I might add – about codes and testing procedures as if it’s all the gospel truth, and as if following these guidelines is going to guarantee anyone’s safety, when in fact, it just ain’t so easy or clearcut.

Certainly this appears to be the thinking behind a lot of the push to legislate our profession as extensively as ASID and company are working hard to do.

Many building materials and products used in interiors, including the foams used in furniture construction, are required by the building code to be treated with fire retardant chemicals – even those products used in the residential environment. In addition, many fabrics are required to be treated with these chemicals, including clothing and bed linens, and all textiles used in the commercial environment.

There is a tremendous and growing body of evidence that these chemicals accumulate in the body and cause a number of major medical problems including cancers and neurological, reproductive, thyroid, and developmental problems, as well as genetic mutations. Studies have shown that many marine mammals and household pets are dying as a result of the accumulation of these chemicals, Continue reading

April 17, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Report from Annapolis

Thanks to David Merrick of NARI for the following summary of the meeting in Annapolis regarding Maryland’s proposed legislation. Because of intense opposition pressure, the amendment turning the bill into a title act instead of a practice act was circulated, and changed the terminology – and they are going to vote on this on Friday, March 20.

They also want to change the existing title act restriction on “Certified interior Designer” to be “Licensed Interior Designer”, and wanted to even restrict the use of the term “interior designer”, but NKBA and others made it clear to them that this was not OK, either. Even ASID officially agrees with not restricting that use now, but the local Maryland people are still trying to push it through.

So, the fight isn’t over yet, folks – read on, and keep on writing and calling your legislators. This could still pass as amended on Friday – or even unamended.

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Yesterday’s hearing in Annapolis was well attended, over 100 people
turned out to testify against this bill. One of the delegates commented
at the start that they had received more emails on this than they did
for the death penalty.

Before the hearing started an amendment was circulated that drops the
practice issues included in the bill and turns the bill into a title
bill for Interior Designers. The original bill would limit the practice
of interior design to Licensed Interior Designers, this would include
kitchens, bathrooms and residential buildings and would greatly affect
design build contractors and people who call themselves Interior
Designers but have no credentials to back that up. The amended bill
would just restrict the title of Interior Designers to people who have
been licensed by the state.

The head of MHIC, Larry Levitan testified in favor of the bill as long
as MHIC contractors were exempted, that helps some of us but would still
affect many of our colleagues. Proponents of the bill say it is needed
to protect the public despite a clean record with no complaints filed
against Interior designers in the recent past.

This is a very political issue and is not dead, the bill could still go
before the legislature un-amended, amended or be killed in committee.
We need it to be killed in committee. If this passes it would be
complete disaster for our businesses.

Use this link to the NKBA website to respond to all of the legislators

http://capwiz.com/nkba/issues/alert/?alertid=12816801&type=ML

It is very important that we stay tuned into what is happening here, I
urge each of you to take a few minutes and write a personal message,
this link is very easy to use and very effective. I received a personal
reply from two representatives.

David Merrick, CR

President, NARI Metro DC

President Merrick Design and Build Inc

301-946-2356

March 19, 2009 Posted by | ASID, Interior Design Legislation Opposition, Interior Design Protection Council (IDPC), Maryland | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment